Dr. Seyed Ahmed Javadpoor

Dr. Javadpoor completed his Internal Medicine training in 1999, at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Paterson, New Jersey. He subsequently finished his pulmonary training in 2001 at St. Joseph’s Hospital. He is a dedicated and knowledgeable physician who takes great pride in ensuring that all patients are treated with respect and dignity.

He has hospital privileges at, but not limited to, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center, Banner Goldfield Medical Center, Banner Ironwood Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, and Chandler Regional Hospital. He resides in Chandler with his family.

Learn more about Dr. Seyed Ahmed Javadpoor on HealthGrades.com.

Dr. Lina Anthony

Dr. Lina AnthonyDr. Lina Anthony joined East Valley Center for Pulmonary & Sleep Disorders in 2007. She completed her internal medicine training at Michigan State University in Flint, Michigan. She then went on to obtain her postdoctoral training in Critical Care from Mount Sinai Medical Center in 2002 and her Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine training from Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, New York.

Dr. Anthony has demonstrated eagerness to help in the political arena by chairing several hospital committees. She is an exceptional physician and provides top notch care to all of her patients. She is also skilled in many pulmonary procedures such as bronchoscopy and percutaneous tracheostomy.

She has hospital privileges at, but not limited to, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center, Banner Goldfield Medical Center, Banner Ironwood Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, and Chandler Regional Hospital Dr. Anthony resides in Mesa with her husband and their two children.

Learn more about Dr. Lina Anthony at HealthGrades.com.

Dr. Sankalp Choudhri

Dr. Sankalp Choudhri joined East Valley Center for Pulmonary & Sleep Disorders in 2008. He completed his Internal Medicine training at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan in 2004. He went on to finish his fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in 2008.

Dr. Choudhri has gone above and beyond and invested his time in volunteer service both at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York and in research for the Parkinson’s disease foundation. Dr. Choudhri is a dedicated worker and is passionate about delivering excellent patient care.

He has hospital privileges at, but not limited to, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center, Banner Goldfield Medical Center, Banner Ironwood Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, and Chandler Regional Hospital. He currently resides in Chandler with his wife and two children.

Learn more about Dr. Sankalp Choudhri at HealthGrades.com.

Dr. Alhassan Badahman

Dr. Alhassan Badahman joined East Valley Center for Pulmonary & Sleep Disorders in 2008. In 1996, he earned his medical degree from St. George University in Grenada. He subsequently completed his fellowship in Critical Care and Pulmonary Medicine from St. George Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey in 2002.

He has worked in Northern Maine as a pulmonary and critical care director at The Aroostook Medical Center and has a deep passion for ensuring that his patients have optimum quality of life despite chronic illness. Dr. Badahman has also held professional and public lectures to help educate both the community and health care professionals.

He has hospital privileges at, but not limited to, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center, Banner Goldfield Medical Center, Banner Ironwood Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, and Chandler Regional Hospital Dr. Badahman strives to combine compassionate service with cutting edge medical knowledge, practices, and technology. He currently resides in Chandler with his wife.

Learn more about Dr. Alhassan Badahman on HealthGrades.com.

 

Dr. Dashant S. Kavathia, M.D.

Dr. Dashant KavathiaDr. Kavathia joined East Valley Center for Pulmonary & Sleep Disorders in 2011. He completed his internal medicine at Henry Ford hospital in Detroit, Michigan in 2005.  He then completed his fellowship in pulmonary and critical care at Henry Ford hospital in 2009. Prior to joining East Valley Center, Dr. Kavathia had worked in a private practice in Atlanta, Georgia.

Dr. Kavathia is an excellent physician who provides exceptional care to all of his patients. He is skilled in many procedures including endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscopy. He has hospital privileges at, but not limited to, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center, Banner Goldfield Medical Center, Banner Ironwood Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, and Chandler Regional Hospital.  Dr. Kavathia resides in Chandler with his wife and two children.

Learn more about Dr. Dashant Kavathia on HealthGrades.com.

Dr. Salman S. Sheikh, M.D.

Dr. Salman S. Sheikh, M.D.Dr. Salman Sheikh joined East Valley Center for Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders in 2012. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in Medicine and Surgery from King Edward Medical College in Lahore, Pakistan.  He went on to residency training in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, in Bronx, New York.  Finally completing his fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Good Samaritan Regional Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona.

Dr. Sheikh has previous experience in private practice with pulmonary disorders, critical care, and sleep disorders. He is a wonderful physician who has obtained a National Talent and Merit Scholarship. He is also a member of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM).

Dr. Sheikh is well respected among both his colleagues and staff members.  He is particularly known for his ability to connect with patients and explain their diagnosis and prognosis in an easy to understand manor.

He has privileges at Chandler Regional Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Ironwood Medical Center and Banner Gateway Medical Center. Dr. Sheikh lives in Chandler with his wife and three children.

Learn more about Dr. Salman Sheikh at HealthGrades.com.

Dr. Arturo “Happy” Castro Jr.

Dr Arturo Castro JrDr. Arturo “Happy” Castro Jr. joined East Valley Center for Pulmonary and Sleep Disorders in 2014.  He received his medical degree from the University of North Texas and did his Internal Medicine, as well as Pulmonary Diseases, Critical Care, and Sleep fellowship training at Michigan State University in Grand Blanc, Michigan from 2003-2009.

He is also a Veteran of the U.S. Air Force, having served in the Medical Corps as a Flight Surgeon with multiple deployments overseas, including Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Iraq, and the Dominican Republic.

He has hospital privileges at, but not limited to, Banner Baywood Medical Center, Banner Heart Hospital, Banner Desert Medical Center, Banner Gateway Medical Center, Banner Goldfield Medical Center, Banner Ironwood Medical Center, Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, and Chandler Regional Hospital. Dr. Castro is passionate about providing patient-centered care and lives in Gilbert with his wife and son.

Learn more about Dr. Arturo Castro at HealthGrades.com.

What is Coccidioidomycosis?

Also known as San Joaquin Valley Fever or Valley Fever, Coccidioidomycosis is an infectious illness caused by breathing in spores from the fungus Cocciodioides immitis which exists in the soil of certain arid parts of the southwestern United States, Mexico, and Central and South America.

Description of Coccidioidomycosis

In the U.S., it was first discovered and very prevalent in the California’s San Joaquin Valley, hence its more popular name, San Joaquin Fever or Valley Fever.

Coccidioidomycosis occurs in a primary and in a secondary form. The primary form, due to inhalation of windborne spores, varies in severity from that of the common cold to symptoms resembling those of influenza. The secondary form is a virulent and severe, chronic, progressive and granulomatous (a mass of nodular tissue resulting from inflammation, injury or infection) disease resulting in involvement of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, viscera, the central nervous system and lungs.

Coccidioidomycosis may affect anyone, but if you are pregnant or your immune system is weak, you are especially vulnerable. The disease tends to be more serious in dark-skinned people.

What Is Emphysema?

Emphysema is a lung disease that reduces the ability of the lungs to expel air, a process which depends upon the natural rubber-band-like quality or elastic properties of the lungs. Damage occurs to the tiny airways in the lungs called bronchioles. Bronchioles are joined to alveoli, tiny grape-like clusters of sacs in the lungs where oxygen from the air is exchanged for carbon dioxide from the body. The elastic properties of the lung reside in the tissue around the alveoli.

In emphysema:

Because the lungs lose elasticity they become less able to contract. This prevents the alveoli from deflating completely, and the person has difficulty exhaling. Hence, the next breath is started with more air in the lungs. The trapped “old” air takes up space, so the alveoli are unable to fill with enough fresh air to supply the body with needed oxygen. A person with emphysema may feel short of breath during exertion and, as the disease progresses, even while at rest.

Emphysema is one of several irreversible lung diseases that diminish the ability to exhale. This group of diseases is called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The two major diseases in this category are emphysema and chronic bronchitis, which often develop together.

For more information about bronchitis, go to Bronchitis.

Facts About Emphysema

  • Nearly two million Americans have emphysema.
  • Emphysema ranks 15th among chronic conditions that force people to limit their activities.
  • Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of emphysema.
  • Most people with emphysema are older men. As with lung cancer and other smoking-related diseases, however, the incidence of emphysema is increasing among women.
  • Emphysema doesn’t develop suddenly. Instead, it comes on gradually, usually after years of exposure to cigarette smoke or some other inhaled irritant.
  • Typically, symptoms of emphysema appear only after 30 to 50 percent of lung tissue is lost.
  • Emphysema rates are highest for men age 65 and older.
  • More people in the Midwest have emphysema than in any other region in the country.
  • Emphysema is an irreversible disease that can be slowed but not reversed or stopped.

Source: ehealthmd.com.

What is COPD?

COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary (PULL-mun-ary) disease, is a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe. “Progressive” means the disease gets worse over time.

COPD can cause coughing that produces large amounts of mucus (a slimy substance), wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and other symptoms.

Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of COPD. Most people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke. Long-term exposure to other lung irritants, such as air pollution, chemical fumes, or dust, also may contribute to COPD.

Overview

To understand COPD, it helps to understand how the lungs work. The air that you breathe goes down your windpipe into tubes in your lungs called bronchial tubes or airways.

Within the lungs, your bronchial tubes branch into thousands of smaller, thinner tubes called bronchioles. These tubes end in bunches of tiny round air sacs called alveoli (al-VEE-uhl-eye).

Small blood vessels called capillaries run through the walls of the air sacs. When air reaches the air sacs, the oxygen in the air passes through the air sac walls into the blood in the capillaries. At the same time, carbon dioxide (a waste gas) moves from the capillaries into the air sacs. This process is called gas exchange.

The airways and air sacs are elastic (stretchy). When you breathe in, each air sac fills up with air like a small balloon. When you breathe out, the air sacs deflate and the air goes out.

In COPD, less air flows in and out of the airways because of one or more of the following:

  • The airways and air sacs lose their elastic quality.
  • The walls between many of the air sacs are destroyed.
  • The walls of the airways become thick and inflamed.
  • The airways make more mucus than usual, which tends to clog them.

In the United States, the term “COPD” includes two main conditions—emphysema (em-fi-SE-ma) and chronic bronchitis (bron-KI-tis). (Note: The Diseases and Conditions Index article about bronchitis discusses both acute and chronic bronchitis.)

In emphysema, the walls between many of the air sacs are damaged, causing them to lose their shape and become floppy. This damage also can destroy the walls of the air sacs, leading to fewer and larger air sacs instead of many tiny ones. If this happens, the amount of gas exchange in the lungs is reduced.

In chronic bronchitis, the lining of the airways is constantly irritated and inflamed. This causes the lining to thicken. Lots of thick mucus forms in the airways, making it hard to breathe.

Most people who have COPD have both emphysema and chronic obstructive bronchitis. Thus, the general term “COPD” is more accurate.

Outlook

COPD is a major cause of disability, and it’s the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. More than 12 million people are currently diagnosed with COPD. Many more people may have the disease and not even know it.

COPD develops slowly. Symptoms often worsen over time and can limit your ability to do routine activities. Severe COPD may prevent you from doing even basic activities like walking, cooking, or taking care of yourself.

Most of the time, COPD is diagnosed in middle-aged or older people. The disease isn’t passed from person to person—you can’t catch it from someone else.

COPD has no cure yet, and doctors don’t know how to reverse the damage to the airways and lungs. However, treatments and lifestyle changes can help you feel better, stay more active, and slow the progress of the disease.

Source:  nhlbi.nih.gov.