Our Sleep Lab

Print the sleep study information packet here.   Sleep Study Packet

A good night’s sleep is vital to our quality of life. But each and every night, there are literally millions of Americans who struggle to fall asleep or are unable to stay asleep. For some this may be a short-term problem caused by stress or long distance travel, but for others the simple act of going to sleep can be an ongoing struggle.

Sleep disorders include insomnia, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, restless leg syndrome, parasomnias (such as sleep walking/sleep talking), shift work, snoring, and nightmares.

If a lack of quality sleep is negatively affecting your health and your ability to effectively function during the day, contact us to schedule a Sleep Study.

Where do I go for my Sleep Study?

Our sleep lab is located on the first floor within our facility at 3155 E. Southern Ave, Suite 202. You can find a map and directions here. Most exams are scheduled between 8:00p.m and 9:00p.m. Monday through Saturday.

What Time is Check In?

Please arrive at your scheduled appointment time so that the technologist can review your paperwork and questionnaires with you prior to hooking you up to your sleep test. Please ring the buzzer located outside the main doors, to the right, above the trash can. A technologist will let you in; you can rest easy knowing that we are a secure facility with fire rescue a mile away.

What to Expect at your Sleep Study (Polysomnogram)

Let’s look at the steps of a polysomnogram in the form of an overnight sleep study.

  1. The patient arrives in the evening between 8:00pm-9:00pm, equipped with night-time necessities such as pajamas, toothbrush, book, and morning attire. You are welcome to bring your own pillow or blanket, things to help you sleep more comfortably.
  1. The sleep lab technician will escort you to a private room where you can put on PJs and get settled in for the night.
  1. Next, a lab technician will hook up an assortment of electrodes to your skin and scalp, along with two belts to encircle your chest and waist. These are to measure how much effort you exert to breathe while sleeping, and another attachment called an oximeter, measures how much oxygen is in your blood.
  1. We encourage you to spend some time relaxing, perhaps reading or watching TV, and then you can fall asleep when ready. It might seem shocking, but according to sleep labs, most patients don’t have too much trouble going to sleep. (All of the sensors are non-invasive and allow you to turn and move as you normally do while sleeping.)
  1. Throughout the evening, all the results pour into the monitoring station. The lab technician will only enter your room if needed.
  1. You will spend the whole night in the sleep lab. In most cases, we will awaken you between 5:30a.m.and 6:30a.m. depending on when you started your test. We can wake you earlier if you request. After you have been unhooked, you may clean up and get ready for your day.

How to Prepare for your Sleep Study

  • Do not take any naps the day of your sleep study; naps may decrease the quality of your sleep that night.
  • Do not drink caffeine on the day of your study.
  • Bathe or shower and wash and dry your hair before the test, as clean skin improves the application of the monitoring sensors. Please shave any facial hair.
  • Do not apply any lotions, hair conditioners, hair creams or tonics.
  • Remove colored nail polish as the color may interfere with the oxygen sensors.

What to Bring with You

  • It is important to remember to bring any MEDICATIONS that you normally take. Unless specified by your Doctor.
  • Please bring loose, comfortable pajamas, and slippers. Fabrics that are slick, such as satin or silk should not be worn because they will make it difficult for the belts to remain on your chest and abdomen. The temperature at the sleep center is cool. Cotton shirt, pants, shorts, etc. are all appropriate.
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste, any toiletries, sleeping mask, ear plugs, etc.
  • Any favorite pillow or blanket.

When do I leave in the Morning?

  • You will spend the whole night in the sleep lab. In most cases, we will awaken you between 5:30a.m.and 6:30a.m. depending on when you started your test. We can wake you earlier if you request. After you have been unhooked, you may clean up and get ready for your day.

After Hours Contacts

If you need to cancel your sleep study after 5pm or weekends, please contact the Sleep Center at (480) 659-6449

What is a Polysomnography?

The dictionary describes it as: the technique or process of using a polygraph to make a continuous record during sleep of multiple physiological variables (as breathing, heart rate, and muscle activity.

What Types of Sleep Studies do you Offer?

  1. Diagnostic Polysomnography (PSG)       
    Diagnostic Polysomnography (PSG Adult and Pediatric) is performed to document physiological events occurring during sleep. The test consists of a continuous recording, generally lasting from 6-8 hours and occurring during a patient’s typical sleep hours.
    The gold standard parameters that we monitor include limited electroencephalogram (EEG) (central & occipital), eye movement and muscle tone (EMG) for the purpose of staging sleep, respiratory effort by chest and abdominal movement, nasal and oral airflow, limb movements, limited electrocardiogram (ECG) and oxygen saturation by non-invasive pulse oximetry.
    The patient’s sleep behavior is also monitored using infrared lighting and a closed circuit camera. Additional parameters are available upon request and may include end-tidal CO2.
  2. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Titration         
    Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Titration is performed while the patient is breathing on CPAP in an effort to eliminate respiratory events occurring during the patient’s sleep. CPAP is initiated and is titrated upward until respiratory events, sleep arousals, and snoring are eliminated.
  3. Multiple Sleep Latency (MSLT)    
    Multiple Sleep Latency (MSLT) is performed to provide objective documentation of daytime sleepiness and to definitively diagnose narcolepsy. This test is routinely performed following a diagnostic PSG to ensure there are no significant disruptions during the preceding night of sleep that contribute to sleepiness during the testing process.

Urine drug screens are also performed to ensure sleepiness is not artificially induced. The testing includes limited EEG (central & occipital), eye movement, muscle tone for the purpose of staging sleep, and an ECG. The patient is recorded during 4 to 5 nap opportunities occurring every 2 hours lasting approximately 20-30 minutes following the PSG. Sleep behavior is also monitored using infrared lighting and a closed circuit camera.